Friday
Mar162012

Apart in Theaters and available on iTunes

Local Hero Post is proud to have done the DI on Aaron Rottinghaus's engaging directorial debut "APART," which is now receiving a limited theatrical run, and is available on video on demand and iTunes.  

The trailer is now up on Apple Trailers (click here).  

Friday
Feb172012

VFX in the Color Bay: Entire Webinar

Assimilate, who sponsored last week's Webinar by Local Hero Post founder Leandro Marini, has posted the entire thing on their Vimeo account. You can view it here:

What VFX have you accomplished in a color system?  Or what would you like to be able to do?  Answer in the comments below.

Monday
Feb132012

Webinar: VFX in the Color Bay

Last Thursday Leandro did a Webinar for FilmmakingWebinars.com, entitled "VFX in the Color Bay."  Using advanced techniques in Assimilate Scratch, he shows how to problem solve some last minute visual effects work while working in a color session with the client.  Typically some shots that would have to be sent out to a VFX artist and returned back into the conform can now me handled on the spot by the colorist.

Here is a 5-minute sample of the session, which is available in its entirety for free at this link: VFX in the Color bay on FilmmakingWebinars.com

Here is the description of the webinar from the website:

The art of digital color correction is constantly evolving and systems and operators are becoming more capable. DI grading consistently moves beyond simple color correction and crosses the line into what used to be considered VFX. A modern grading session blends the two and makes the grading suite a very powerful, sometimes daunting, environment for polishing a film in many different respects. 

In this webinar, we'll address the short history of DI color correction, including the transition to digital, how much VFX can (and should be done) in the DI bay and work through some hands on projects using ASSIMILATE's SCRATCH, including how to remove a boom from a shot, how to perform makeup and beauty work, and even replace an entire sky.

Friday
Jul012011

Webinar: RED’s EPIC HDRx Workflow in SCRATCH

 

Webinar: RED’s EPIC HDRx Workflow in SCRATCH from ASSIMILATE on Vimeo.

 

If you missed our FREE Webinar session on RED's EPIC HDRx Workflow in Scratch: You can catch up on our 30 minute Webinar Video. Let us know what you think...

Leandro Marini, founder and DI Producer at Local Hero Post and Blair Paulsen, founder of 4-K Ninjas, demonstrate the best practices for photography and post-production workflows of RED EPIC RAW and EPIC HDRx files with ASSIMILATE SCRATCH.

Friday
Jun032011

Red Epic HDRx Test Examples

The last week has been a whirlwind of testing Red's new 5K Epic digital cinema camera, special thanks to Blair Paulsen for lending us his camera, one of the first Epics available. Beyond its high resolution beautiful sensor, the new kid in town is called "HDRx," and is a creative take on something that digital cameras have lacked for awhile: High Dynamic Range.   

Leandro put together a video summing up our tests, check it out on Vimeo:

Local Hero Epic HDRx Test from Local Hero Post on Vimeo.

The Epic sensor without HDRx is already in the 11 to 13 stop range, depending on who you ask.  With HDRx, however, you get an entirely separate exposure, 2 to 6 stops darker than your original capture.  How it works is this:  the camera exposes a proper shutter speed of 1/48 of a second, and then right after takes a quick second exposure at a fraction of that, say 1/96 of a second or shorter.  What you get on your R3D files afterward is a video file that contains two separate video tracks, "A" and "X" of the different exposures: one with better exposed shadows, and one with better exposed highlights.

Red Epic HDRx A track and X track Side by Side, Ungraded

Processing these two separate tracks into something usable is a job for the post process, using a fast system, perhaps a Red Rocket card, and the software that can take advantage of it natively, like Assimilate Scratch.  RedCineX has a nifty little blending mode, where you can slide between the two streams and fade them together until you're happy.  We at Local Hero, however, did a little experimenting on our own to move beyond simple opacity blending, to see how good we could get an HDRx final image to look using more complex techniques.

The HDRx implementation in Scratch is pretty simple.  When you bring in your R3D you have the choice to show either the "A track" 0 or the "X track" 1.  Drag the second track into a scaffold layer, and you can choose how to combine them.

We chose to use a Luma Key, where you lay the X track on top and key out the darker areas of the image, then grade both images so that you can't see where one video track leaves off an the other takes over.  This can come together quickly, or be finessed quite a bit to make an image that you're happy with.  True, the images are slightly different temporally, as well as exhibiting different ammounts of motion blur.  If your shot has a lot of motion and hard edges, then you may see some artifacting.  In these cases there are software solutions to add motion blur back into the X-track to help them blend better. 

Here are some stills (with uncompressed 16 bit TIFF links available) to compare on your own.  They are scaled to 2K, perhaps I can get a full 5K version up in the future.  Down at the bottom are some ProRes 4444 files as well.  

Red Epic Normal Exposure "A Track", Graded

16 Bit Tiff, A track Graded

16 Bit Tiff, A and X track Compared


Red Epic HDRx "X Track', Ungraded

16 Bit Tiff, X Track Ungraded


Red Epic HDRx Composite (Luma-keyed), Ungraded

16 Bit Tiff, HDRx Composite Ungraded


Red Epic HDRx Composite, Graded

16 Bit Tiff HDRx Composite Graded

And now the second test image, first a side by side of the ungraded A and X tracks:

Red Epic HDRx A and X track Comparison

16 Bit Tiff, HDRx A and X track Comparison


Red Epic Normal Exposure "A track", Graded

16 Bit Tiff, A track Graded


Red Epic HDRx "X track", Ungraded

16 Bit Tiff, X track Ungraded


Red Epic HDRx Composite (Luma keyed), Ungraded

16 Bit Tiff, HDRx Composite Ungraded


Red Epic HDRx Composite, Graded

16 Bit Tiff, HDRx Composite Graded

And now the final videos, rendered to Prores 4444 in 2K:

Local Hero Red Epic HDRx Example 1, Quicktime ProRes 4444

Local Hero Red Epic HDRx Example 2, Quicktime ProRes 4444

We hope to post the actual R3D files soon, as soon as we can figure out a practical way to do so.

Thanks for watching, let us know how you fared with your own grading tests in the comments below.

 

Andrew Wahlquist

Chief Technologist, Local Hero Post